The Psychology of Colour

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Have you ever felt a sense of anxiety in a yellow room? Does the colour blue make you feel relaxed and at peace? Perhaps like many, you’ve never really considered how the colours around us could have the power to shift our emotions and affect our moods.

This ideology goes back long before the artists and interior designers of today, when man first understood that fiery red signalled danger and that those tempting purple berries were in fact poisonous.

Artists and designers frequently used colour as a form of communication, using green in stained glass to promote feelings of hope and black to represent a negative presence and death.

Fast forward to the present and the concept of colour psychology has become something of a hot topic in marketing, art and of course interior design. Suddenly, it seems like an obvious choice to spare a thought to the psychology of colour next time a colour-making decision presents itself.

We’ve put together a round-up of a selection of colours and their psychological meanings:

Red – The colour of danger, but also warmth, passion and optimism. Known to stimulate the appetite, red is a common colour for eating areas as it also promotes sociability and liveliness.

Green – Most commonly associated with nature, energy and of course GO! A reliable choice of colour, many shades of green are calming and restful. Be wary though, use too much green in the workplace and the staff could find themselves just a little too laid back…

Blue – A great promoter of intellectual thought, with calming and soothing properties. Just like the ocean or a clear sky, blue is serene, contemplative, loyal and can give a strong sense of authority.

Blue – A great promoter of intellectual thought, with calming and soothing properties. Just like the ocean or a clear sky, blue is serene, contemplative, loyal and can give a strong sense of authority.

Yellow – The most visible colour due to its light reflecting properties. Often thought of as cheery and warm, yellow has also been found to create feelings of frustration, anxiety and even anger.

Brown – A natural colour, evoking a sense of strength and reliability. Brown can stimulate feelings of isolation if overused, but can also be sophisticated and offer strong feelings of security.

No matter what the expert reasoning is behind each colour, it should be remembered that all colours of the spectrum are subject to many personal, cultural, and situational factors specific to the person.

Colour psychology forms just part of a wide range of considerations that should be made when embarking on a new design project, as we strive to create your perfect space.

Posted June 2, 2015

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