The UK’s coolest offices?

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We’ve just come across a great article which was published on the BBC website back in December on some of the more bizarre design features found in the UK’s coolest offices.

Google, famous for favouring quirky office designs, has released early plans for a new headquarters in London’s King’s Cross, including plans for a range of unusual design features such as roof-top running track and a climbing wall. However the latest news is that Google have withdrawn their plans saying that they wanted to challenge themselves to be even more ambitious!

Many companies, especially those in the technology or creative sectors, are investing increasing amounts of time and money into creating offices that are more reminiscent of children’s bedrooms or school playgrounds rather than traditional offices. The idea behind these unusual design ideas is to encourage creativity and collaborative thought whilst also attracting and retaining talent.

The idea behind these unusual design ideas is to encourage creativity and collaborative thought whilst also attracting and retaining talent

The BBC’s article, written by Kate Magee, gives several examples of some of the more bizarre/cool offices in the UK. For example Mind Candy, the company who brought us Moshi Monsters, has an office which includes a wooden treehouse, gingerbread house and break-out areas that a reminiscent of hobbit houses. The idea behind Mind Candy’s office design to encourage employees to think more like their clients, i.e. children.

The entire office floor at Innocent drinks is carpeted in fake grass with bunting-festooned ceilings, whilst advertising agency Karmarama welcomes employees into work via a disco tunnel and has a collection of weird objects in the office, including a VW camper van and a giant red statue of Buddha.

So is it worth having a quirky office interior? According to a recent study carried out by Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota, having a wacky office could help employees be more creative in their research, whilst employees working in more traditional office environments were more likely ‘to conform to expected behaviours.’

To read the BBC article which includes images of the office interiors mentioned, please visit the BBC website.

Posted February 11, 2014

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